The Theory

“In the late 1960s, Stanislaw R. Burzynski, MD, proposed that a naturally occurring and continuously functioning biochemical system in the body, distinct from the immune system, could ‘correct' cancer cells by means of ‘special chemicals that reprogram misdirected cells.' He called these chemicals ‘Antineoplastons,' and defined them as naturally occurring peptides and amino acid derivatives that inhibit the growth of malignant cells while leaving normal cells unaffected.” Textbook

Antineoplastons

Dr. Burzynski sees cancer as a disease of cellular information processing. Antineoplastons seem to correct the program inside the cell and can change a cancerous cell back to a normal cell. Dr. Burzynski described a study carried out at the Department of Pathology for the Department of Defense in Bethesda, Maryland. The study showed that using antineoplaston AS2-1 in tissue culture caused cancer cells to change back into normal cells after approximately two to three days.

Healthy cells specialize as they develop. After a specific number of cellular divisions, these specialized cells are programmed to die. Cancer cells, due to incorrect programming, undergo uncontrolled cellular proliferation. They keep multiplying without limit until they finally kill the patient. Dr. Burzynski has postulated that antineoplastons reprogram cancer cells so they behave like normal cells, with a limited life span.

The antineoplastons have to be administered continually and for a long enough time to allow the previously cancerous cells to go through their life cycle to cellular death. If the therapy is slowed down or stopped too soon, the cell (which still has an incorrect program) will start behaving like a cancerous cell again.